Welcome to Cheltenham Labour Party

Chelt-Labour-Banner.jpg

The Labour Party in Cheltenham was founded in 1918 by the Cheltenham and District Trade and Labour Council with the purpose of electing onto the Town Council direct representatives of Labour.

A purpose we still pursue to this day nearly 100 years since the Labour Party first established itself in the town.

The values Labour stands for in Cheltenham today remain those which have guided our local party since those early days.

 

We believe in and we campaign for:

  • A first-class National Health Service free at the point of use

  • A decent, safe and secure society with a strong sense of community and social justice

  • The protection of public services and support for the most vulnerable

  • A strong and stable economy based on investment, growth and high quality jobs

  • The right to work, to free choice of employment, to protection against unemployment and paid at a living wage

  • The provision of readily available, decent, secure homes to rent and buy at affordable prices

  • An education system that delivers quality and equality for all to allow all the children and young people of our community to achieve their full potential

 

Latest News . . .

Jeremy Corbyn re-elected as Leader of the Labour Party.

 

 Jeremy-Corbyn-Labour-leadership.jpgAt the Labour Party Annual Conference in Liverpool, Labour today announced that Jeremy Corbyn had been re-elected as Leader of the Labour Party.

The full result of the election is as follows:

Jeremy Corbyn: 313,209 (61.8%)

Owen Smith:     193,229 (38.2%)

Votes cast:         506,438 (Turn-out 77.4% )

Spoiled:                 1,042

The total number of eligible voters was 654,006

 

The full breakdown by type of elector are given below:

Members

Number who voted: 285,176 (56.3% of all voters)

Voted for Jeremy Corbyn: 168,216 (59%)

Voted for Owen Smith: 116,960 (41%)

Registered supporters

Number who voted: 121,517 (24% of all voters)

Voted for Jeremy Corbyn: 84,918 (70%)

Voted for Owen Smith: 36,599 (30%)

Affiliated supporters

Number who voted: 99,745 (19.7% of all voters)

Voted for Jeremy Corbyn: 60,075 (60%)

Voted for Owen Smith: 39,670 (40%)

Labour Leadership Election 2016

Jeremy Corbyn re-elected as Leader of the Labour Party.    At the Labour Party Annual Conference in Liverpool, Labour today announced that Jeremy Corbyn had been re-elected as Leader of...

Jo Cox MP

 Jeremy Corbyn MP, Leader of the Labour Party, speaking about the tragic loss of Jo Cox, MP for Batley and Spen today said:

The whole of the Labour Party and Labour family — and indeed the whole country — will be in shock at the horrific murder of Jo Cox yesterday.

Today, I have travelled to Birstall to bring the condolences of the Labour movement to Jo's family and constituents.

Jo Cox was an outstanding and inspiring new Member of Parliament, who had already shown in her life and work her dedication to the cause of peace and social justice.

She was killed doing the job she was elected to do — representing the people she was elected to serve, doing her duty to the public and our democracy.

The killing of Jo Cox was not only the tragic loss of a fantastic human being, woman, mother, wife, friend and comrade to so many of us inside and outside Parliament: it was an assault on democracy itself. It was an attack on the right of everyone to have their say in how our country is run and for those that the people elect to be able to listen to and represent them, without fear or favour.

As Jo's husband Brendan said in his extraordinary and poignant tribute, Jo Cox was also the victim of hatred and intolerance.

Ours is a country where tolerance and respect for other people and different viewpoints have always been highly valued.

Jo Cox stood for tolerance, justice, peace and human rights. We must come together as a country and face down hatred and intolerance in our society.

We send Jo's family, her two young children and her husband Brendan our deepest condolences and love. They are in the hearts of all of us.

Jo Cox MP

 Jeremy Corbyn MP, Leader of the Labour Party, speaking about the tragic loss of Jo Cox, MP for Batley and Spen today said:

budget.jpgThe truth behind the Tax Credit cut U-turn by Chancellor George Osborne is that it will have no effect and will not help families in the long run.

Why?

  • Because tax credits are being phased out and replaced by Universal Credit which was unaffected by the Autumn Statement.

  • Because the Government is still planning deep cuts to working-age benefits that will directly hit low-income working families.

  • Because lots of other benefit cuts announced in July are still going ahead with more announced in the Autumn Statement.

 

Even after the announcements in the Autumn Statment the Government is still planning £12bn of cuts to annual benefit spending by end of the parliament.

With £4bn from a freeze on benefits to 2020, £4 to 5bn in additional cuts to Universal Credit and £1½bn of cuts to housing benefit and other smaller changes.

The changes in Universal Credits (UC) being rolled out will represent an additional cut on top of other changes to the tune of £3.7bn a year.

4.5m working families will be affected by introduction of UC

  • 2.6m lose an average of £1,600 a year

  • 1.9m gain an average of £1,400 a year
  • Total cut of £1.5bn a year


1.8m non-working families will be affected by introduction of UC

  • 1.2m lose an average of £2,500 a year

  • 0.6m gain an average of £1,000 a year

  • Total cut of £2.2bn a year

Those hit hardest by the new universal credit rules will be lone parents, disabled people and couples with children who rent their home rather than have a mortgage.

U-turn on cut in tax credits only delays the squeeze on poor working families

The truth behind the Tax Credit cut U-turn by Chancellor George Osborne is that it will have no effect and will not help families in the long run. Why? Because...

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